Views of #Corsica

 

Romantic Corsican landscape

Romantic Corsican landscape

The House at Zaronza is two years old today. To celebrate, here is a photo journey through some of the places and views on Corsica that have inspired me during our six visits there. I have taken hundreds of photos on Corsica, but these are among my favourites. I can feel a seventh visit coming on…

The village of Nonza and the Paoline Tower, which commands both the village and the sea far below. This place provided inspiration in so many ways.

Nonza on Cap Corse

Nonza on Cap Corse

The Paoline Tower at Nonza

The Paoline Tower at Nonza

The lovely apricot-painted church at Nonza.

Church at Nonza

Church at Nonza

Saint-Florent, an atmospheric port at the base of Cap Corse. You can see the peaks of Cap Corse stretching into the distance. Last year, we took a road trip right around the Cape, which is stunningly beautiful.

Saint-Florent at the base of Cap Corse

Saint-Florent at the base of Cap Corse

Corte, the heart of the island, a place we keep returning to. Here Pasquale di Paoli headed the short-lived independent Corsican republic, which collapsed after the Battle of Ponte Nuovo against French forces in May 1769. Genoa had already transferred Corsica to France the previous year.

The citadel dominating the town of Corte, surrounded by rugged mountains

The citadel dominating the town of Corte, surrounded by rugged mountains

The Restonica Valley near Corte, followed by the wilder Tavignanu Valley. The two rivers meet at Corte.

River Restonica near Corte

River Restonica near Corte

Tavignanu Valley

Tavignanu Valley

Lavender in the maquis, the scrubby vegetation that covers much of the island. Corsicans returning to the island claim they can smell the aromatic scents out at sea as they approach. Bandits and those escaping justice after vendetta incidents ‘took the maquis’, where they lived while evading capture.

Lavender, a typical maquis plant

Lavender, a typical maquis plant

Ajaccio, Corsica’s main town today, where Napoleon Bonaparte was born in August 1769. His parents fled from Corte through the maquis after the Battle of Ponte Nuovo, taking the ancient mule track from Corte along the Tavignanu.

The Old Town in Ajaccio, Corsica

The Old Town in Ajaccio, Corsica

Ancient Tavignanu mule track

Ancient Tavignanu mule track

The haunting megalithic site at Filitosa in the southwest of the island near the Gulf of Valinco. The purpose of these enigmatic statues is not clear. Some scholars believe that the inhabitants of the site sculpted their foreign enemies as a way of removing their power. Whatever the role of these ancient warriors, the hairs on the back of my neck stood up as I looked into their faces.

Bonifacio on the southern tip of Corsica. From here, you can see the island of Sardinia across the sea.

Bonifacio from the sea

Bonifacio from the sea

The wonderful Pisan church at Murato, made of green and white marble, with a frieze of mythical beasts. A real gem.

Pisan church at Murato

Pisan church at Murato

Corsica is an endlessly fascinating and inspiring place as well as being blessed with magnificent landscapes. My next two novels will be set there, too.

You might also like:

Revisiting Inspiration on Corsica
Ten Inspiring Things About Corsica: Part 1
Ten Inspiring Things About Corsica: Part 2
Why Corsica Should be a Happy Hunting Ground for Authors

Copyright © Vanessa Couchman 2016. All rights reserved.

3 thoughts on “Views of #Corsica

  1. Beautiful photos, I thoroughly enjoyed this tour around Corsica this morning. It is somewhere I have always wanted to visit but have never been. Surrounded by French Islands here on the Atlantic coast, I feel it is time we ventured south and explored another one!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I have hundreds of Corsica photos, so it’s almost impossible to decide which ones to include, but these are places that have a particular resonance with me. Corsica has a character and culture all its own, so I hope you’ll visit. I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

      Like

  2. Reblogged this on Crooked Cats' Cradle and commented:

    How quickly do two years pass? In a flash. The House at Zaronza celebrates its second birthday today. Thank you to my readers for all the lovely comments I’ve received. Corsica remains one of my biggest sources of inspiration.

    Like

I love reading your views, so please feel free to leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s