Writers Inspired by Corsica

Forgotten Revolutionary: Pasquale Paoli and #Corsica / The story of the man who led Corsica's republic 1755-69 and almost won the island its independence.
Corte in Corsica’s heartland

The island of Corsica has long exerted a fascination on writers, enthralled by its history and culture and by the charismatic power of its mountainous landscape.

My friend and fellow Ocelot Press author, Sue Barnard, kindly invited me onto her blog. I look at some of the novels and other writings that have been set on the island.

Corsica is blessed not only with magnificent, mountainous scenery but also with an intriguing history and culture. The island provides inspiring material for historical novelists. It has also fascinated writers for centuries.

Tavignanu Valley

“Corsica” Boswell

During the 18th and 19th centuries, a number of authors visited and wrote about Corsica. James Boswell, better known as Samuel Johnson’s biographer, visited Corsica during his Grand Tour in 1765. The young Corsican republic was struggling for independence from Genoa. Boswell was greatly impressed by Pasquale di Paoli, the republic’s leader, and published An Account of Corsica on his return to England.

Read the rest of the article here.

You might also like:

Pasquale Paoli: forgotten Corsican revolutionary

Of Mountains and Men: how Corsica’s landscape shaped its history

Fictional versus real settings in novels

Copyright © Vanessa Couchman 2021. All rights reserved.

Published by Vanessa in France

We moved to an 18th-century farmhouse in SW France in 1997. I'm fascinated by French history, rural traditions and customs. I also write historical novels and short stories.

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