History People #2: Miriam Drori, an Unintentional History Person

A big welcome to fellow Crooked Cat author Miriam Drori, who continues my series about authors who write historical fiction. She’s involved in an interesting co-authoring project with another writer, but I’ll let her tell you about that.

Sunday Sojourn – Corsica

Originally posted on Jennifer C. Wilson:
Happy Sunday everyone – the last before December kicks in… Today, we’re travelling to Corsica, with Vanessa Couchman. It’s somewhere I’ve always thought of visiting, but never quite got around to, so I’m sure I’ll be tempted after this! Hidden Treasure in Corsica Thank you for inviting me, Jennifer.…

Women in Traditional Corsican Society

Oppressed, subservient, insignificant? Does that accurately describe Corsican women in past times? Not always. That Corsica was a patriarchal society can’t be denied. But to portray the island’s women as downtrodden and overlooked is to over-simplify a complex situation. A previous post explored marriage customs in Corsica. This time, I look specifically at the roleContinue reading “Women in Traditional Corsican Society”

Excerpt from ‘The List’, a WWII short story

This week, I’m publishing a short extract from my story, ‘The List’, which is set in occupied France. The story originally appeared in an anthology entitled Pearl Harbor and More: Stories of WWII – December 1941, published by eight authors of wartime fiction. The short stories were set in locations around the world and commemorated theContinue reading “Excerpt from ‘The List’, a WWII short story”

Courtship and Marriage Corsican-Style

In Corsica, relations between the sexes have always been regulated by unbreakable codes of honour. I researched courtship and marriage customs on the island for The Corsican Widow, which is set there during the 18th century. The Corsican ideal of honour is central to the story.

This Book is Worth More than Rubies to Me

This book doesn’t look like much, I know, and the subject may seem a little abstruse – Everyday Life in Corsica in the 18th Century. But this was the only copy available outside faraway libraries; the very last one I could get hold of. Why is it so important to me? Because it’s invaluable for oneContinue reading “This Book is Worth More than Rubies to Me”

History People #1: Wartime Fiction: Wandering Off the Beaten Track

This is the first in a series of guest posts by fellow historical fiction authors. Dianne Ascroft, who writes World War II fiction, kicks it off with some thought-provoking reflections on unusual settings for wartime fiction and what readers are looking for. Thanks for joining us today, Dianne.

History: a thing of the past?

Today, I’m delighted to welcome guest blogger Olga Swan, who also lives in SW France. Lamplight, the first in her David Klein, war-reporter, series is released tomorrow by Crooked Cat. Olga’s post gives us a flavour of her series, which spans the build-up to World War II and the war itself, and outlines some of theContinue reading “History: a thing of the past?”

Nursing in World War I: the French Experience

Writing a credible historical novel is like doing an obstacle course with your hands tied. A significant challenge for me in writing The House at Zaronza was to find out about nursing from a French viewpoint on the Western Front during World War I, where about a third of the novel is set. Countless books existContinue reading “Nursing in World War I: the French Experience”

How was it for you?

  This blog has been a bit quiet recently, but there’s a reason for that. Along with countless others, I emerged from National Novel Writing Month on 30th November, having just about snatched victory from the jaws of defeat. I hit the requisite 50K words on 25th November, but I’m still feeling a bit shell-shocked.